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Going to the Ends of the Earth to Study Ice Sheets, Sea Level and Global Climate Change

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NOVA Science Seminars
Going to the Ends of the Earth to Study Ice Sheets, Sea Level and Global Climate Change
Nov 18, 2011 - Dr. Julie M. Palais

A science seminar titled "Going to the Ends of the Earth to Study Ice Sheets, Sea Level and Global Climate Change” was held on Friday, November 18, 2011 in the CE Forum. Dr. Julie M. Palais of the Office of Polar Programs, National Science Foundation (NSF), is the speaker. This event was open to all students, faculty and staff and is sponsored by the Mathematics, Science and Engineering Division and the Lyceum.
Recent media attention on global warming and sea level rise has focused public interest on the research of polar glaciologists. Palais will discuss recent work funded by the NSF’s Office of Polar Programs. Palais manages the Antarctic Glaciology program at NSF, which is concerned with the history and dynamics of all naturally occurring forms of snow and ice, including floating ice shelves, glaciers, and continental and marine ice sheets. Her program emphasizes paleoclimate studies of ice cores, ice dynamics, numerical modeling, glacial geology and the remote sensing of ice sheets.

Palais is the program director of the Antarctic Glaciology Program in the Office of Polar Programs at the NSF. She has directed polar glaciology research at NSF since 1990. Her research programs have emphasized various aspects of glaciology including the history and dynamics the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. Her own research involved the study of volcanic fallout in ice cores. Palais has made some 25 trips to both Poles, first as a researcher and then to observe the research conducted under her direction by the Antarctic Glaciology program. She was a co-recipient of the Explorers Club’s Lowell Thomas Award in 2007 for her contributions to climate change research.